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to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
, just got him. and, it's not how a democratic government is supposed to act. fresh outrage, after egypt's president makes a near absolute power grab in a country with great influence in the middle east peace process and an american partner and high stakes diplomacy. ♪ >> harris: returning to the same place that gave birth to the country's revolution less than two years ago, this sends president mohamed morsi a message, what freedom fighters say must happen to stop a new cycle of violence in the streets. fox reports live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who
, tensions are rising in cairo and across egypt, days after that country's new president once hailed as a hero and reformer made a huge power grab that has some labeling him egypt's new pharaoh. tonight supporters and opponents of mohamed morsi are calling for mass demonstrations. nbc's jim maceda is high above cairo's tahrir square. jim, good evening. >> reporter: hi, kate. well, of course, tahrir square behind me was ground zero for egypt's 2011 uprising, but lately it's had a similar feel and the smell of tear gas is back in the air. clashes between morsi opponents and riot police raged through the night and into a second day. protesters turning tahrir square into a tent encampment and pledging to target the besieged president until he designs or rescinds the decrees which give him sweeping powers and put him above the law. the move has triggered riots across the country, injuring more than 300 egyptians. "if morsi does that, we'll be exactly like iran, said this protester. "he is making himself not just a dicer, he's making himself a god." he said he had to take action to take ra
. and that's later. and next, egypt's new president makes a power play. [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. >> an eye for an eye, taliban style tops world headlines tonight. a suicide bomber detonated a truck full of explosives today in eastern afghanistan. three afghan civilians were killed and more than 90 people wounded. the taliban says it was retaliation for the recent execution of detainees. pakistan is suspending cell phone service m most parts of the country this weekend to prevent attacks of shiite muslims during a religious observance and militants often used phones for detonate bombs and killed more than a dozen people this week. what some are calli
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
from all women who are going to watch the grapevine tonight. we'll explain coming up. up next, egypt's president stands firm on the sweeping new powers. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith roastedegetab! i'm actually looking at the wo grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. at pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. >> bret: the obama adminis
'll also visit egypt and the west bank city of ramallah. and while the two sides are trading cease-fire proposals, israel's ambassador tells erin burnett his country is ready to launch a full-scale ground invasion. we talk to our reporter in phnom penh. she's been following the secretary of state. she departed just a few minutes ing aheaded to the middle east. good morning, jessica. what can you tell us about the secretary of state's mission? >> reporter: hi, john. good morning. the secretary of state is headed now to israel, ramallah and egypt to see if she can work with those three partners to try -- well, not partners -- but those three interests to see if she can help fashion some sort of a cease-fire. her trip was announced here in cambodia by a white house official, ben rhodes, with the national security council. and he made it very clear that in the white house's view, the primary onus is on hamas to take the first step in starting this truce by stopping their rocket fire into israel. listen to what he had to say. >> the bottom line still remains that hamas has to stop this
egypt in tunnels. coming literally through the country of egypt. the problem is they are coming from iran. in to egypt. in to the tums and in the gaza strip. they are shot from gaza to tel aviv. david lee mentioned today, but tell avive has seen missiles and jerusalem here, tel aviv ssiles are going this way. the issue here, this is hamas. hamas is a terrorist organization who are targeting population, civilian population centers within israel. that's why israel is retaliating with so many strikes back to the gaza strip. hezbollah and palestinians are more than willing to violate some geneva act, war crimes targeting the civilians. >> dana: they will. we want bob's take on this. first, listen to president obama who said america does stand with israel. >> there is no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders. so we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes. >> dana: that is president obama. of course, the leader of israel has words to say as well. listen to him. >> i hope th
president played a role here. how significant is it that egypt is playing the shots? >> when it came to trying to mediate the deals, egypt has played a critical role what has changed is the dynamics, the ally of the west and the de facto ally of israel is no longer in power and the egyptians became an entity and that changed a lot of the dynamics and that has changed the way it has been playing out here on the ground. the frame work of what is transpiring here, that is what has changed at this point. most certainly, given the fact that it is a young government, it has in one sense past that first critical test. thank you very much indeed. >> welcome to you. >> thank you for having me. >> can you you outline what you believe the spirit of this agreement to be today? it is an a grerraigngement that been with the support of the united states and it promises us the people of southern israel peace and quiet. that they no longer have to fear rockets coming in. the promise of the possibility to live a normal life. >> i understand that it promises the people of gaza a better future we are he
morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events
that is now unfolding in egypt, where just hours ago, the country's highest judicial body calling for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
of that craziness. >> the new protest out of egypt this morning because what started out as some protests in tahrir square has spilled over to other parts of the country. this all comes after thursday's decrees from egyptian president mohammed morsi basically saying you know that judiciary that we have? you know the judges that we have? if i make a decision, they are not going to be able to review anything that i do anymore. essentially cutting out the judiciary becoming by all accounts a dictator. >> yeah. all the checks on his power were essentially removed. and it did appear that this guy became a dick day or two overnight. what was worrisome about it is how quickly it all happened. and basically a 12 to 24 hour span after the united states congratulated mohammed morsi on doing such a great job helping to broker a peace agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
continues over the benghazi terror attack. we'll discuss the situation in egypt. the cease-fire in gaza, and the libya investigation when we sit down with senator john mccain. it's a fox news sunday exclusive. then is the looming fiscal cliff casting a shadow over shoppers and investors this holiday season? visions of bargains are dancing in the heads of consumers. will the possibility of higher attackses slow them down. we'll talk with matthew shay, president of the national retail federation and john sweeney of fidelity investments. the holiday is over for white house and congressional leaders trying to make a deal. we'll ask our sunday panel if they can reach a compromise. >>> a thanksgiving tradition, our power player of the week has me dancing with turkeys, all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. on this holiday weekend we're watching several major foreign policy developments from egypt to gaza to the continuing converse over the benghazi attack. to talk about it all is senator john mccain. welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> thank y
for the israeli people. the israelis and jihad and other organizations, egypt is being held responsible by the united states and the entire world for the rockets coming out of the gaza strip, if there are any. another point to make is that there is going to be a cessation attempts to stop the weapons smuggling that is coming from egypt into the gaza strip. if you look at this live, there is a faint glow and rocket interceptor that went out. the school has now burned out. but we are not at the point of the cease-fire agreement as of yet. that will come in about 58 minutes. you just heard the boom from the rocket interception overhead of the gaza strip. here is what to look for in the next 50 minutes. there is going to be heavy fire, as we traditionally see, where everyone lights off as many rounds as they can. israel has been hitting a lot of targets behind me in the gaza strip and going forward, there will be 12 or 24 hours for it to take effect. it takes a while for everyone to get the memo to stop firing. this is a big moment for mohammed morsi. a couple of years ago he was part of th
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
, and the coup in egypt, the president seemingly in search of a campaign. after a long holiday weekend, does anyone remember been gauzy? to find out, we are joined by of and the daily column founder and editor cockies contributor. thank you. let's start with republican party. is that too strong a word? in disarray. >> i think disarray is a little strong right now. we will see. it is one thing to talk about these issues so far in advance. in terms of the norquist tax pledge and certainly the susan rice, these are noises that you made to sound conciliatory after an election, and we think back to 2009. the republicans sounded very conciliatory in the days after president obama's reelection when he was holding a high approval rating, but by april or may of his first year that that had melted away. so right now is happy talk from the republicans. we will see whether that materializes into votes. lou: such happy talk, why aren't there more smiling faces in the republican party? >> pretty unhappy talk from what i can tell, and to this point pretty frivolous. you see members of the united states sen
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
need to help the libyans train a national army. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: ther
. secretary of state clinton announced the ceasefire at a joint press conference with the egyption foreign minister, secretary clinton praised egyptian president, and muslim brotherhood member morsi for brokering the mosque. that is considered a terrorist organization by the u.s. government, of course. >> i want to thank president morsi for his leadership in ending the violent, this is a critical moment for the region. egypt a new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stabilitiy it peace. lou: the ceasefire hours after a bomb tow through a bus in israel's defense ministry in tel aviv, it injured at least 2 dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take out right responsibility. a damascus based group with ties to the west bank took credit. the israeli government confirmed this is only the first stage of a ceasefire agreement work many questions remain stock answered. a second set of negotiations reportedly to begin within the next 24 hours, israel's blockade of the gaza border, and an end to the f
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." egypt on edge. thousands of furious protesters pack tahrir square after their new president makes a bold move for unprecedented power. so far, so good, that cease fire between israel and hamas is holding for now. but there are real fears even the slightest flare-up could kick off chaos. >>> how was i to know he would do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west, and here's where we start this morning. larry hagman's family says he was surrounded by family at the end. the 81-year-old actor died of complications from cancer. he's best known for his iconic portrayal of j.r. ewing in the show "dallas." it's a role that he always called his favorite. peter fonda said goodbye to his friend on twitter, saying hagman brought so much fun to everyone's life. cnn entertainment corresponde m correspondent careen winter joins us.
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
. i don't pretend to know the solution. but i see that egypt -- president morsi has -- has gotten involved. i see this getting more complicated, an already complicated situation, getting more complicated. does that in any way increase our obligation or is there something strategeically than to issue condemnations. >> we have also had to -- the new head of government in egypt, recognize the importance of the truce with israel that egypt has had. some of the things he has done this week are very troubling toward that end. you upon, he went into gaza. while he was there, hamas launched more rockets, as a direct affront to that negotiated peace between egypt and israel that. piece is essential to u.s. security policy in the region. and so we are going to have to insist and mr. morsi honor that -- >> greta: what leverage do we have with him? >> well, i mean, certainly, there is a package of aid that the egyptians are asking for right now, for giveness of debt, is one aspect of that. you know, i think that the message needs to be sent that the largess of the american taxpayers doesn't c
president of egypt being the prime mover here, pressured by the u.s., but bringing together all sides? i'm not sure that ayman can hear us. we have a satellite delay. can we talk about the diplomacy from the standpoint of hamas and the muslim brotherhood? >> yeah. andrea, these talks have been now under the auspices of the egyptian government but more specifically under the au spis sis of intelligence officials. they can meet with israel and the palestinian factions. it's unlikely that president m mahmoud morsi was going to sit down with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some poi
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